Cognitive training with virtual reality at older people longterm residences

a series of cases

  • Bruna Graciele Souza Alós Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil; Instituto de Cardiologia, Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia (ICFUC), Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil. http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4914-2849
  • Nathália Vescia Bauer Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil; Instituto de Cardiologia, Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia (ICFUC), Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil. http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3162-2692
  • Verônica Salazar Moreira Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil; Instituto de Cardiologia, Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia (ICFUC), Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil; Hospital Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil. http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4197-1033
  • Rafaela Soares Rech Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3207-0180
  • Aline Moreira de Mello Fundação Hospitalar Getúlio Vargas, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil. http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9602-9777
  • Maira Rozenfeld Olchik Fundação Hospitalar Getúlio Vargas, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil. http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8732-9225
Keywords: virtual reality, neurological rehabilitation, cognitive impairment, dementia, institutionalized elderly health

Abstract

Purpose: to describe a series of cases of older people with a clinical diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment or dementia at elderly long-term residences using virtual reality as cognitive rehabilitation.
Methods: this study is a series of cases. Older adults diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment or dementia were included. Elderly people with visual and/or hearing problems that made it impossible to carry out the training were excluded. The same tests were used after intervention and at follow up after 15 days.
Results: final sample consisted of 13 women and the mean age was 81.77 years (± 6.94). Patients were divided into 2 groups: mild cognitive impairment group and the dementia group. According to the therapeutic objectives aimed at improving fluency, among the results, the improvement in the scores to the group mild cognitive impairment stands out for the phonemic verbal fluency tests 23.63 (± 12.72) pre-test and 29.50 (± 11.14) post-test. There was an improvement in mild cognitive impairment group scores for the phonemic verbal fluency tests 23.63 (± 12.72) pretest and 29.50 (± 11.14) post-test. In the dementia group, test scores were 10 (± 5, 47) pretest and 12.80 (± 5.72) post-test. On the semantic verbal fluency test, the mild cognitive impairment group showed improvement 11.00 (± 3.62) pretest and 13.88 (± 6.03) post-test, while the dementia group test scores were 7.60 (± 4.56) pretest and 8.20 (± 5.12) post-test.
Conclusion: regarding phonemic verbal fluency, virtual reality may be a good resource for improving the performance of older adults with mild cognitive impairment. Results were not maintained in the medium term, showing the importance of continual training.

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Author Biographies

Bruna Graciele Souza Alós, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil; Instituto de Cardiologia, Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia (ICFUC), Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil.

Fonoaudióloga Clínica, em Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil; Graduação em Fonoaudiologia pela Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), em Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil.

Nathália Vescia Bauer, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil; Instituto de Cardiologia, Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia (ICFUC), Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil.

Aluna do curso de Fonoaudiologia pela Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), em Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil. Bolsista de iniciação científica pela Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), em Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil.

Verônica Salazar Moreira, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil; Instituto de Cardiologia, Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia (ICFUC), Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil; Hospital Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil.

Fonoaudióloga Clínica, em Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil; Graduação em fonoaudiologia pela Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), em Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil.

Rafaela Soares Rech, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil

Doutora em Epidemiologia pela Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, (UFRGS), em Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil; mestre em Odontologia na área de concentração Saúde Bucal Coletiva pela Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), em Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil; Pós-Doutoranda em Odontologia pela Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil.

Aline Moreira de Mello, Fundação Hospitalar Getúlio Vargas, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil.

Fonoaudióloga Clínica, em Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil; Graduação em fonoaudiologia pelo Centro Universitário Metodista (IPA), em Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil.

Maira Rozenfeld Olchik, Fundação Hospitalar Getúlio Vargas, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil.

Doutora em Educação pela Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, (UFRGS), em Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil; Professora Associada Nível II da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), em Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil.

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Published
2021-10-20
How to Cite
Alós, B. G. S. ., Bauer, N. V., Moreira, V. S., Rech, R. S., Mello, A. M. de, & Olchik, M. R. (2021). Cognitive training with virtual reality at older people longterm residences: a series of cases. PAJAR - Pan American Journal of Aging Research, 9(1), e39769. https://doi.org/10.15448/2357-9641.2021.1.39769