Potential interactions between drugs used in metabolic syndrome

  • Vanessa Adelina Casali Bandeira UNIJUÍ
  • Karla Renata de Oliveira UNIJUÍ
Keywords: DIABETES MELLITUS, DYSLIPIDEMIAS, HYPERTENSION, DRUG INTERACTION, OBESITY, METABOLIC SYNDROME X, DRUG THERAPY

Abstract

AIMS: To identify the drugs indicated for the control of chronic noncommunicable diseases that constitute the metabolic syndrome, included in the National List of Essential Medicines, and the potential positive and negative drug interactions between them, classifying them according to severity. METHODS: The drugs used for the control of chronic noncommunicable diseases through Brazilian Guideline for Diagnosis and Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome, as well as specific guidelines for each disease that constitute metabolic syndrome were identified. Among these, we selected those listed in the National List of Essential Medicines. In the second part of the study, through a literature search, the potential drug interactions were identified, and were classified as positive or negative and according to their severity. RESULTS: Nineteen drugs were identified in the National List of Essential Medicines, each of which had at least one potential drug interaction, totaling 89 potential interactions. Among these, 20.22% were classified as positive, these being mainly represented by the association of antihypertensive drugs; and 79.78% were considered negative, of which 14.09% had great severity. CONCLUSIONS: The treatment of metabolic syndrome is complex because it requires the combination of several drugs, which increases the risk of drug interactions and adverse effects. This study identified a number of potential drug interactions between these drugs, which can reduce or enhance their effectiveness and expose the patient to risks.

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Published
2014-06-24
How to Cite
Bandeira, V. A. C., & Oliveira, K. R. de. (2014). Potential interactions between drugs used in metabolic syndrome. Scientia Medica, 24(2), 156-164. https://doi.org/10.15448/1980-6108.2014.2.16330
Section
Original Articles