Effect of blood contamination and decontamination procedures on marginal adaptation and bond strength of composite restorations

  • Josiane Luzia Dias Damé Universidade Federal de Pelotas
  • Dione Dias Torriani Universidade Federal de Pelotas
  • Flávio Fernando Demarco Universidade Federal de Pelotas
  • Marília Leão Goettems Universidade Federal de Pelotas
  • Sinval Adalberto Rodrigues-Junior
  • Evandro Piva Universidade Federal de Pelotas
Keywords: Blood contamination, dentin bonding agent, marginal adaptation, dye staining gap test, push-out test, composite restoration

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the effect of blood contamination and different decontamination procedures on marginal adaptation and bond strength of a two-step total-etch adhesive system to dentin. Methods: A total of 135 bovine incisors had the labial surfaces ground to receive cylindrical cavities, and were randomly divided into a control and 8 experimental groups (n=15) according to contamination and decontamination procedures. Freshly collected human blood was applied onto the cavity either before or after light-curing of the adhesive. Four decontamination protocols were tested (drying with paper, water rinsing, phosphoric acid etching, and 10% NaOCl rinsing). The cavities were restored with Adper Single Bond and Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE). The specimens were subjected to thermal cycling before the dye staining test. The cavity floor was removed and the restorations were subjected to a push-out test. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α=0.05). Results: Blood contamination after adhesive light-curing increased marginal gap and yielded lower push-out bond strength values (P<0.01). Conclusion: Water rinsing seems to be a reliable procedure for cavity decontamination. The decontamination procedures tested do not recover marginal sealing and bond strength when blood contamination occurs after light-curing of the adhesive.

Author Biographies

Josiane Luzia Dias Damé, Universidade Federal de Pelotas
DDS, MSc, Department of Operative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, RS, Brazil.
Dione Dias Torriani, Universidade Federal de Pelotas
DDS, PhD, Professor, Department of Social and Preventive Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, RS, Brazil.
Flávio Fernando Demarco, Universidade Federal de Pelotas
Professor, Department of Operative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, RS, Brazil.
Marília Leão Goettems, Universidade Federal de Pelotas
DDS, Graduate Student, Department of Social and Preventive Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, RS, Brazil.
Sinval Adalberto Rodrigues-Junior
Private Clinician, Chapecó, SC.
Evandro Piva, Universidade Federal de Pelotas
DDS, PhD, Professor, Department of Operative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, RS, Brazil
Published
2009-05-21
Section
Original Article